Heriberto Ponce

MFA, Fiber

Statement

My work addresses the subject of immigration, which has had a negative effect on migrant communities of the past and present, including my own family experiences.  One of the elements that I use in my work is barbed wire—a material used to make barriers and boundaries, however it is mainly utilized to control access.  In coincidence the city of Dekalb, were I am constructing my work, is well-known as the city were the production of barbed wire took place in the United States.  

In my work, barbed wire represents a harsh rejection from our neighbors on the North American side of the border. A symbol of pain and rejection for us migrants, it also represents the cost of human lives, broken homes, countries in ruins and cultural identities destroyed. This has been the result from the need to cross the southern border in search of a better life.  It is a horrible unfriendly act from the American side that we have a border on the south. I feel that it should be like the Canadian border which is just a line.   

Through weaving with hand-dyed materials, handspun fibers as my family did for many years. I preserve stories that convey a sense of what immigrants have gone through when making this difficult journey.  No one grasps what is really happening to the human lives risking it all while crossing the southern border. I want to bring awareness of this issue to the audience through my artwork. 

When I use clothing in my weaving, the clothing represents the absence of human life whether lost in transit or loss of life. Through different circumstances like separation or sickness, a few grasp the reasons and repercussions migrants’ risk to cross the southern border. 

We Are Found, 2019
Woven clothing and barbed wire in cotton warp on an aluminum frame, natural dyed with walnut, 4’x5′

I Want To Break Free, 2018
Serigraphy Print on Somerset Paper, 15″x22″

Ten Dollars and Change, 2019
Woven handspun paper currency with handmade Nickle, Silver, and Copper barbed wire, 14.5″x23.5″

Invisible Borders, 2020
Serigraphy Print on VFK Rives Paper, 22″x30″

Blocks II, 2016
Woven handspun yarn (natural dyed with Sumac, Cochineal, Queen Anne’s Lace, Goldenrod, Prickly Pear, and other plant dyes), 3’x4′

Unseen Risks, 2017
Woven handspun wool (dyed with acid blue) with barbed wire, 9’x20′

Heriberto Ponce

MFA, Fiber

Statement

My work addresses the subject of immigration, which has had a negative effect on migrant communities of the past and present, including my own family experiences.  One of the elements that I use in my work is barbed wire—a material used to make barriers and boundaries, however it is mainly utilized to control access.  In coincidence the city of Dekalb, were I am constructing my work, is well-known as the city were the production of barbed wire took place in the United States.  

In my work, barbed wire represents a harsh rejection from our neighbors on the North American side of the border. A symbol of pain and rejection for us migrants, it also represents the cost of human lives, broken homes, countries in ruins and cultural identities destroyed. This has been the result from the need to cross the southern border in search of a better life.  It is a horrible unfriendly act from the American side that we have a border on the south. I feel that it should be like the Canadian border which is just a line.   

Through weaving with hand-dyed materials, handspun fibers as my family did for many years. I preserve stories that convey a sense of what immigrants have gone through when making this difficult journey.  No one grasps what is really happening to the human lives risking it all while crossing the southern border. I want to bring awareness of this issue to the audience through my artwork. 

When I use clothing in my weaving, the clothing represents the absence of human life whether lost in transit or loss of life. Through different circumstances like separation or sickness, a few grasp the reasons and repercussions migrants’ risk to cross the southern border. 

We Are Found, 2019
Woven clothing and barbed wire in cotton warp on an aluminum frame, natural dyed with walnut, 4’x5′

I Want To Break Free, 2018
Serigraphy Print on Somerset Paper, 15″x22″

Ten Dollars and Change, 2019
Woven handspun paper currency with handmade Nickle, Silver, and Copper barbed wire, 14.5″x23.5″

Invisible Borders, 2020
Serigraphy Print on VFK Rives Paper, 22″x30″

Blocks II, 2016
Woven handspun yarn (natural dyed with Sumac, Cochineal, Queen Anne’s Lace, Goldenrod, Prickly Pear, and other plant dyes), 3’x4′

Unseen Risks, 2017
Woven handspun wool (dyed with acid blue) with barbed wire, 9’x20′

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